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Allowing people in to view my house

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199 views 1 replies latest reply: 02 February 2016

Hello everybody. At the start of this month my landlord contacted me to inform me he was moving abroad and selling the house i have rented off him for many years. I have 2 months to move out and he assured me that no-one would be coming to view the house while i was still in it. After having to sitting in 4 times for estate agents for him i have now been informed people will now be coming to view the house.

So after him reneging on our agreement i am now expected to take time out of my days to allow people into my home with all my stuff in it to traipse around my house. Added to this my daughter has leukemia, has low immune system and is home alot. These constant visitors may give her an infection which will lead to days in hospital. Also im spending alot of my time trying to find a house for myself and my family (3 of us). Ive paid rent for years and should be allowed to enjoy my home while i can.

My question to you all is, do i have to let these people into my home?. Can i refuse on medical grounds?. What can my landlord do about it?.

Thank you.


Hi Ann

What does your tenancy agreement say? Usually, it will require you to allow the landlord access during the last few months. However, the viewings can’t take place without your consent because – as I understand it (I’m not a lawyer) – your tenancy gives you a right to exclusive possession right up until the last day. So, you can refuse but it would probably be advisable to offer a reasonable alternative. So, perhaps you could suggest they schedule a bunch of viewings for a Saturday morning when you and your daughter are not there, or limit viewings to one a week, or start in the last week only. I would start by putting your objection in writing, pointing out the risk to your daughter, your right to refuse consent and saying that, as a result of that, they need to be mindful when asking to schedule viewings to keep disruption to a minimum. 

Realistically, it would be unwise of the landlord or agent to try to sell the house so that a buyer is scheduled to move in the day you leave – in theory, you could refuse to leave and then you’d have to be evicted, which would take another 3-6 months, so any deal the landlord has made would fall through. A wise landlord would either wait until you have left to start the viewings or to be in less of a hurry and perhaps leave them to the last week or so.


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