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Compensation for mild threats? Can landlord evict for poor standards of living?

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171 views 1 replies latest reply: 11 June 2016
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Tenant

what is an appropriate standard of living? Who decides? We have just moved in two months ago and already the landlady does not seem to like our way of living. She emailed us mostly for kitchen habits which we have tried to meet at our utmost best standard. Next week, her mother comes for inspection and disapproves our living saying it is below standard. But what is the legal backing to support this? There is no evidence of any physical damage and we spend loads of money of chemicals to get the place and tip top shape and still they are not happy. What can we do now? She did say they will not serve the notice to evict but that we should consider moving out. Don’t know if it was a threat without a legal backing. Clearly, there was nothing that she liked about our living.

can someone suggest if this was a mild threat? How do we protect ourselves in the future from such reckless and unreasonable way of threatening behaviour? If standard of living is an issue, can we get a independent assessment of our living style to prove her wrong? Lastly, we feel vulnerable and have lost trust on this landlord. We do prefer to move out actually at this stage. But, we also want compensation for not allowing us to enjoy our property at peace. Can we ask her to compensate us for preventing peaceful enjoyment of the property? Can we ask for refund of our rent as we have not got an opportunity to enjoy the place and already we are asked to look for another. Is she liable for any violation of tenant’s rights to enjoy property without giving us a guideline about what she means by “high standard of living”. 

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Service provider

Hi Wendy,

You are entitled to quiet enjoyment of your premises.

The landlord is entitled to carry out periodic inspections, but she must give you reasonable notice – 24 hours is reasonable. 

Do you have a clause in your tenancy agreement which specifies the standard of cleanliness she expects?

I suggest you start logging the dates of the inspections and taking dated photos to support your assessment of the condition.

If the intrusions continue, put in writing your concerns and ask that future inspection requests should be made in writing, so you have evidence of her visits.

John

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