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1167 views 1 replies latest reply: 05 November 2013

I have just decided to decorate my rented flat but some of the wall’s are the dreaded ‘woodchip’. It’s a nightmare to paint as you may well imagine.It’s obviously been painted a couple of times before and a friend say’s it really needs to be taken down and the wall’s re-plastered. I peeled back a small area in a corner and a bit of plaster came with it.

My tenancy agreement just say’s that the wall’s need to be left the same colour when I leave as they were when I moved in, to use only matt paint on the wall’s, and not to use wallpaper, but, because of this woodchip problem am I responsible for stripping the woodchip and replastering?

Many thanks.



Hi Sarah

You should speak to your letting agents or landlord. If the plaster lifted so easily it could be that there is a damp problem or maybe they put the woodchip on to cover faults in the plastering.

The easiest thing you can do is to slot the broken plaster back in and stick the the bit you peeled back into place. Then paint over it. It may be that the wall needs re-plastering and if any of your friends are professional painters and decorators you could get a quote for doing the work, send a letter to your landlord or letting agent and tell them that it has been suggested that this work should be done. You could also mention that you are having difficulty painting it because it has been painted over before. They can then decide whether or not they want the work done.

The landlord is not required by law to repair any interior problems such as internal plaster, internal doors or skirting boards, unless these are affected as a result of the exterior of the property not being in a good repair. In these circumstances the landlord would be required to ensure these aspects were restored to good working order, had they been affected by the poor exterior of the property.

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