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landlord company communication absence

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442 views 1 replies latest reply: 31 December 2014
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Tenant

We rent a flat from a landlord that is a company. The assured short hold tenancy agreement has started 21 Nov 2009 and has been renewed every new 12 months. Each time, they charge a £90 admin fee, and they increased the rent every year from 1100, 1125, 1185, 1200 and 1300 pcm.
This is due for another 12month renewal in 21 Nov 2014, but we haven’t received yet any mail from them. The payment is taken by direct debit on the 1 of each calendar month. They haven’t also debited rent for 1 December.

As of now, we aren’t covered by any tenancy agreement…

Would you advice to proactively contacting them to sign a new 12months agreement? I am 100% sure they will want to increase to 1400.
Or would you just let it go until they realize their mistake?

Does the length of our stay in this flat has any legal bearing on our right to demand for example a 24 month tenancy agreement instead of 12?

rds,

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Administrator

If they were still taking rent from you then you would most likely have switched to a periodic tenancy (some more information on that here). However, the fact that they aren’t taking the rent payments is a bit odd. It’s probably advisable to contact them simply because you’re going to be in arrears if you’re not paying rent but living in the property. 

£100 a month is a substantial rent increase – we published a blog today about rent increases which found that last year rents went up 8% and that resulted in an extra £44 a month, which is considered to be quite a lot! There are ways of appealing a rent increase, such as a rent tribunal – Shelter has some good advice on this.

As far as we know the length of time you’ve been in a property won’t give you any legal right to demand a longer tenancy. However, if you’ve been a good tenant and the landlord wants to keep you then you could ask for this as part of the negotiations? It does have the benefit of giving the landlord the security of a tenant for 24 months instead of 12.

Alex

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