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Live in landlord issue (manchester area)

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511 views 1 replies latest reply: 19 October 2014

Only minor issues, if a live in landlord i am staying with has since made changes to the offering since i have been there.

I had 2 rooms and sole use of a bathroom, which is being reduced down to one room and a shared bathroom, as decided to move another tenant in.

I wonder what i may be able to do in such a situation as i took on a 6 month verbal agreement (as didn’t receive a written agreement) and feel i might get better value elsewhere. Also i would only share with one person as this was what i was looking for.

In addition, if said landlord moves a partner in, i would be uncomfortable sharing with a couple and was wondering if this may be grounds to find something else before the 6 month expiry.


Thanks for your question in our forum.

Usually, when a tenant has a written AST and wants to move out during the fixed term, they can do so only if the landlord agrees to it. This is called ‘surrendering’ the tenancy. If they do not follow the legal procedures, they can end up having to pay rent until the end of the fixed period.

It sounds as though the original terms of your verbal agreement have changed, and therefore you may be within your rights to terminate the tenancy. While verbal contracts are considered legitimate, they are difficult to enforce because there is no way of proving what was agreed.

It would be worth having a calm discussion with your landlord about your feelings. If you decide you still want to move out, you should agree a notice period suitable to the both of you to avoid any hard feelings.

Why not take a look at our blog on the topic of verbal vs written tenancy agreements:

All the best.

Disclaimer: This information is derived from personal experience and should not be relied upon as a definitive or accurate interpretation of the law.

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