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Newly Self-Employed and Applying to Rentals

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725 views 2 replies latest reply: 21 May 2015

Hi Everyone,

My partner and I are both newly self-employed freelancers (we both went self-employed 5 months ago). Because of this, we haven’t filed any tax yet or hired an accountant yet. We are wanting to move to where I will be studying my masters degree part-time this september.

I’m a little concerned about how self-employed referencing for a rental requires you to provide tax details or accountant information – because we don’t have this yet! As I said, it’s only been 5 months. Can I offer to provide a bank statement that proves our funds? We can’t use a garanteur as both our families live in Australia.

Thank you,



Hi Rachael

You can get a statement from the bank that indicates your monthly income will be enough to cover the rent payments. You could also offer rent up front – usually six months rent up front is accepted as an alternative to a guarantor. You could also try to convince them to accept an overseas guarantor – I’m not sure on the legality of that but it’s worth a try. 

Other suggestions might include providing evidence of savings and of any guaranteed work that you have coming in over the next year, as well as references from previous employers. However, the most convincing option is probably going to be offering them up front rent.

Hope that helps



I was going to post a new thread but we have a similar situation so might be useful to tag it to Rachael’s post.

My wife has just started a new job which is full time permanent but of course she is working through her three month probationary period. She is middle management and on a salary of £45000 per year. She was with her previous employer for 9 years and there was not break between jobs. Her credit record is very good.

I however am a bit of a spanner in the works. I recently went self employed, just over two months ago to be precise so I have no accounts yet and won’t have for probably another 10 months. I am still on a retainer from the company I used to work for. My credit record is not so good with one default but no ccj’s or anything else.

We have lived in our current home for the past nine years. Unfortunately our landlord passed away last Summer and the family put the house on the market in Feb 2015. It looked like it would not sell for a long time being a listed building and needing a lot of work but eventually a buyer was found at the end of April and we were given two months notice.

So bad timing for us! Our late landlords family are more than happy to provide references as we have been very good tenants and always paid on time and have looked after the place very well. Infact it’s better now than when we moved in.

We recently applied to rent a house but after referencing we were rejected. Apparently there was concern over my wife being on a probationary period at work and my employment status.

I have to say things have changed a lot since we last moved. Back then we had less money than we have now but it was a lot easier to rent a place. Now it seems they want your complete life story along with all sorts of guarantees.

We can’t provide a guarantor, we simply don’t know anyone we could ask.

I have a feeling our options are very limited? Unfortunately we need to be out of here by the 15th June so what to do? What should we tell letting agents when viewing properties? What is our best option to secure a rental?

Oh and to add further to our pain, we were on a very low rent for the last nine years. Our landlord said he wasn’t interested in increasing it as he would just pay more tax and he liked having us here. So now landlords see how much we were paying and say that they are worried we cannot afford the much higher rents they are asking. The world seemingly has gone completely mad!


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