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notice to quit

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337 views 1 replies latest reply: 19 October 2015

Hello all,

So ive been having a bit of bother with my landlord. missed appointments, texts in text talk at gone 9pm and before 7:30am giving not even 12h notice to him wanting to come by He wanted to increase the rent by £100 which was fine, what wasnt was he gave me a new contract to sign on the 19 of sep and wanted the increase rent paid at the begginging of the month the 1st of sep! so an out of date/backdated contact! this was a NO NO. I wrote a letter which he has seen and collected/acknolaged via text, asking for the contract to remain rolling/periodic as it has been for the last 1.2 years, informed him i would not be signing an out of date contract and he should contact me by mail not text and supply me with a corrispondence address as the agents he used a few years back he no longer uses and I have no other address for correspondance.. he says he now wants possesion of the property back and his new agent would be in contact on monday this was a week ago still no word or an address for me to send correspondence to. i believe he has 28 days to supply this but what if i want to give my notice to quit how can I with no address?

any help appreciated



Hi Aaron

You don’t have a right to a rolling contract – if the landlord wants you to sign a new tenancy agreement then he is well within his rights to ask you to do so or to serve notice. Do you pay your rent on the 19th in advance for the next month? If so that might make sense of what the landlord is saying – if your new tenancy would start in the month of September then the increase should start on 1 September too. However, if the first month of the new tenancy is October then that doesn’t make sense, as you say.

Your landlord’s address should be on your tenancy agreement so have a look there. The tenancy agreement should contain a specific paragraph on service of notices and there should be an address provided there. Your rolling tenancy is based on that original tenancy you signed so all those provisions still apply. You could also check the Land Registry and see if you can get contact details from there or call the local council. Make sure you send your notice recorded delivery so you have proof of receipt.

Just FYI, landlords must give 24 hours notice to enter a property, not 12, and they can’t do it without your consent unless it’s an emergency. To be honest I think it sounds like he’s bluffing with the ‘new agents’ serving notice. But you’re probably right to serve your own notice now as he sounds like a bit of a mess.


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