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Problems-with-your-heating-and-hot-water.pdf - need a specific law

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48 views 1 replies latest reply: 16 October 2016

Hi, from the tutorial pdf attached onto the site, called “Problems-with-your-heating-and-hot-water.pdf” I found the following text:

“In fact, there is a minimum heating standard which requires the property to sustain temperatures of at least 18°C in bed rooms and 21°C in living rooms. There should also be a fully functioning system that can be used as needed wanted whenever the temperature outside is -1°C or lower.”

Could anyone point me to the law that specifies this?

My landlord currently decides when to provide heat (which he does on a specific timeframe, disregarding internal our external room temperature variations) and he provided me with an oil filled radiator so that I could ‘heat my room separately’, as he doesn’t want to pay more gas to heat the room to a real confortable level. Lowest temperature in the room was 15C in the last months. I’m specifically worried about the coming winter… The problem is that by the current tennancy I have to use a coin meter which is set at 35p/kWh! Just testing the device for 3 days on auto, for 23C (as the room has really poor insulation – which I am unable to find anywhere in terms of what EPC rating it’s at) added around 6pounds worth of expence for just 8h in total. No one replied to my other topics and I’m unable to find any law that tells me 2 important questions:

– what is the minimum heat level the landlord is forced to provide

-how much can he set for the electricity price?

Much appreciated, this has given me way too much hassle and I’m not sure where to find answers or legal advice.


Here is document from the GOV website that includes a relevant paragraph :

Look under “EXCESS COLD”

Additionally, the heating equipment provided must be efficient in a manner that allows you to heat your room without going bankrupt.

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