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Roof leak - notified landlord feb 2014

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717 views 1 replies latest reply: 25 July 2014

Hi guys…

I was wondering if I could get any help on this issue at all please?

I’ve been living in my current house since feb 2013 and we have had roof problems the whole time. This year my housemate moved in to the smaller bedroom and basically when it rains the water just comes through the walls. This has ruined photos/clothes personal belongings of hers and also after spending her own money on redecorating the room ruined that too!

We have a hole which you can put your foot through in the ceiling. I’ve told my landlord about this in feb this year and he got a letting agent to take over the contract in May (I have a feeling living in London and having tenants point these things out became too big for him) we had an assessment with the letting agency’s contracted builder in May and still have not been given a date as to when this will be sorted.

We have been paying full rent £1200 PCM with my housemate unable to stay in her room when it rains and having to store her belongings in mine so they aren’t getting damaged…

I’ve been patient and understanding what with taking over the contract and builders being available but I just feel this is too much now…

Is there any advice anyone can give? I’m run bring shelter on my lunch as I just don’t know where to go from here.



Hi, thanks for posting in our forum.

The Landlord and Tenant Act 1985 makes your landlord responsible for repairing the structure and exterior of your home (so long as your tenancy is for a term of less than seven years). The Housing Act 2004 makes it clear that ‘the structure and exterior of the property’ includes all outside walls, roof, external doors and windows.

It can be extremely frustrating when you are paying full rent on a property that is desperate need of repair. There are things you can do to resolve the matter.

Inform the landlord in writing

The procedure for reporting repairs begins with a series of letters to the landlord – given that the landlord passed over management of the property to a letting agent, I would assume that you have informed the landlord in writing of the issues and that there has been a follow up letter? If not, please write one asap.

Gather evidence

As you have not heard anything from the landlord or their representative since May, you should gather as much information as you can about the repairs required in case you need to make a complaint (including photos, receipts of items damaged, and copies of letters or emails you have written to the landlord).

Inform the landlord you will contact the council

Write a letter informing the landlord that you will be asking the council to check if the property is safe to live in. Hopefully, by this stage, the landlord and his representatives will act and arrange for the repairs to be carried out.

Ask the council for help with repairs

If there is still no action, write to the council requesting help with getting your landlord to do the repairs. They should be able to offer help and advice and work with the landlord to get the repairs done.

There are further steps you can take and letter templates on the Shelter website:


You and your flatmate may be able to claim compensation for the damaged/destroyed property and possibly the costs of redecoration due to the failure to carry out repairs. You will need to have receipts and photos as evidence for this. Your flatmate may also be able to claim for ‘abatement’ which is when you are unable to use all or part of the property due to disrepair. The amount of compensation you can claim depends on your circumstances to it is advisable to take legal advice on your specific claim before starting any action.

See our articles for more info:

All the best of luck!

Disclaimer: This information is derived from personal experience and should not be relied upon as a definitive or accurate interpretation of the law.

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