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Shower removed without notice, left with bath only

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374 views 1 replies latest reply: 16 June 2015


I am seeking advice as a tenant with a letting agency. The tilework in my bathroom was leaking and water going through to the floor below. I went to work while repairs had been scheduled (after many months of course) and came back to find that my bath had been replaced, but now the shower attachment had gone, shower rail and curtain also gone. The shower is in the inventory as a seperate entry. I asked the letting agents for a reduction in rent due to inconvenience, reduced facilities and increased water costs of £25 per month. They agreed for one month only and are now asking for the full amount. I am about to dispute this with them so wondered if I could get some advice on removing inventory items and my rights. I am a young professional with early morning starts and have explained to he agency that I would not have taken the flat if there had not been a shower.

I would appreciate any advice before contacting the agency.



Hi Joe

Does your tenancy mention anything about a shower? And does it incorporate the inventory? Some tenancies will put an obligation on the landlord to look after the fixtures and fittings, which is often defined to include anything listed in the inventory. If that’s the case then I would imagine they should have obtained your consent.

More to the point, if they’ve agreed to one month rent reduction then they’ve set a precedent – what has changed between that discounted month and now? Nothing, you’re still without a shower. You could put it to them that unless they want to replace the shower the rent should stay the same.

In terms of what you can do if they refuse, it’s complex. If you start withholding rent then you’ll be in breach of your tenancy agreement so avoid that. You could try contacting the landlord directly and hoping they will be reasonable. Or you could speak to someone at Citizens Advice or a Law Centre and see if they think you might have a case for a breach of tenancy. You’d probably have to sue to get any compensation but sometimes the threat of that kind of action is enough.


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