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Q: Can I rent privately without a guarantor?

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last updated: 28 Jul 2014 report a problem

There are things you can do to assure a prospective landlord that you are not a risk as a tenant without a guarantor.

For example:

1. You could suggest paying for a Rent Guarantee and Legal Expenses Insurance Policy. It is an insurance policy for Landlords that covers rent if tenants fall in arrears. Additionally, if the tenant runs up any legal costs (e.g eviction costs), then the insurance company will pay for it. Policies can vary in price, but cost approximately £120 for a year. If you are willing to pay that extra insurance cost, it may convince the letting agent and landlord that you are a safe bet even without a guarantor. You can find out more information at:

2. Another way of persuading the landlord is to suggest an increase of the security deposit amount. You could offer two months’ worth of deposit, as opposed to the regular one month, in order to provide the landlord with a better sense of security. Provided that you take excellent care of the property during your tenancy, your deposit would be returned to you at the end of the tenancy. Do ensure that it is properly protected in one of the government schemes.

Security deposits are most often used for the following:
 to clean the property at the end of the lease term, if the tenant did not leave the property in a clean condition;
 to pay utility bills, if the tenant did not pay the bills; or
 to pay rent, if the tenant did not pay the rent.

3. If you are really desperate to secure the property, you could offer to pay a larger deposit as well as the insurance policy.